Vases by Decha Archjananun

February 13th, 2012

The vase deconstructed by student Decha Archjananun.  Archjananun split the vase into two basic functions, a vessel to hold water and a form to support the stems.

(via dezeen.com)

Google Images

January 31st, 2012

Amazing to see how people are taking Google’s image capturing technology and adapting it for their own art.  Top, Aaron Hobson’s photo-stitched images taken from remote Google street views are both beautiful and haunting.  Below, Jenny Odell uses Google satellite photos to create collages of related objects.  There is something so satisfying about seeing objects grouped together.  The photo above shows a collection of salt ponds.

Bus Gardens

January 29th, 2012

A green roof for a bus designed by Marco Castro Cosio.  Inserting little bits of green back into the city wherever they can fit.

Yumiko Ishihara

October 28th, 2011

OK, I am back, so let’s get back to it.  Beautiful installation at the Koganecho Bazarr by Japanese architect Yumiko Ishihara.  Ishihara made this display using 3,000 chopsticks and bamboo sticks as part of the Yokohama Triennale.  Not only is the pure simplicity of the piece striking, it also allows for visitors to look through to different areas keeping the sight lines open.  Everything about this just seems so elegantly delicate – I am not even sure what was displayed, but I imagine they are gentle tiny little works.

(via designboom.com)

Brit Insurance Design of the Year

March 16th, 2011

The Brit Insurance Design of the Year was announced yesterday at the Design Museum in London.  A panel of judges selected the Plumen low-energy (and aesthetically pleasing) light bulb designed by Samuel Wilkinson and Hulger (left).  Judge Stephen Bayley explained,  “The Plumen light bulb is a good example of the ordinary thing done extraordinarily well, bringing a small measure of delight to an everyday product.”  Last year’s winning product was also related to energy use.  Designer Min-Kyu Choi created a slimmed down version of the UK electrical plug (right).  It’s nice to see that in the glut of design junk that gets produced, thoughtful designs can still rise to the top.

Pasta by Hand

March 10th, 2011

I am enjoying the recent re-focus on food and how we grow, make and eat it.  I came across this nice project by Italian design student Valentina De Lorenzis, in which she explored the process of making new pasta shapes by hand and using homemade tools (top).

In a similar vein, the Italian design wonders at Arabeschi di Latte have hosted two pasta making workshops in Tokyo, and most recently, in London.  Visitors are invited to play with the design using an assortment of tools (left), ingredients and recipes (right).  The pasta is cooked on the spot for participants to enjoy.  Clearly, the Italians have a strong connection pasta, I wonder what Denver’s food would be?  Could be something to do with buffalo meat, but we also have western slope wines, Rocky Ford cantaloupes, green chiles and peaches.

Blu Dot Swap Meet

March 3rd, 2011

Those clever fellows over at Blu Dot have done it again.  Remember their Real Good Experiment?  Now they have a new project called the Blu Dot Swap Meet.  The idea is simple.  Pick a piece from their collection you’d like to own and post a reasonable trade on their site.  Folks can support your campaign and if your entry is deemed awesome enough, Blu Dot will swap you for it.   So far winning swaps have included a sofa for a popsicle stick motorcycle, a spork collection (shown) for a chair and a Texas BBQ feast for a couch.  The Sock Monkey chair above is still vying for a swap.

Ruin Academy

February 15th, 2011

I have been thinking obsessively about the Ruin Academy since I came across the project a few weeks ago.  The Ruin Academy is a research center in Taipei based on the, “Third Generation City – the organic ruin of the industrial city.”  It is a joint project between two universities, the Finland based Casagrande Laboratory and the Taiwanese JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture.

Using an abandoned apartment building as an experimental platform, students explore the practices of urban architecture, sociology and environmental art.  The structure has been stripped to the bare bones by removing the interior walls and windows to let the elements inside.  Six inch holes punctuate the walls (middle right) to let rain inside to grow bamboo and vegetables. As the project explains, “the Academy is a constantly changing mixture of a ruin and a construction site.”

Inside the space, the universities hosts classes and workshops, while also providing ad-hoc sleeping space for participants.  In the top right picture, you can see one of the rolling beds.  I love the idea of an unused building becoming a canvas for researchers to experiment and play.  Nothing seems too precious or planned.

Wanted: Floor Bookshelf

February 1st, 2011

OK designer friends, who wants to make me one of these?  Cast iron bookshelf, circa 1920’s, USA.

Matt Brown: Taglieri

February 1st, 2011

As a curator and researcher, I am really interested in objects that have been adapted to the user.  One such project is Taglieri by Matt Brown, an American industrial designer.  While living in Italy, Brown came across a cutting board that had formed the perfect groove after being cut with the same round knife for over thirty years.  To capitalize on this time tested enhancement, Brown had the object scanned and created a new cutting board that reflected the original mark.

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